Cadillac SRX Headlight Lawsuit

Cadillac SRX Headlight Lawsuit

The plaintiff in the Cadillac SRX Headlight Lawsuit alleges that the defect did not appear until years later. According to ECF No. 1 at PP 63-66, Plaintiff purchased a 2016 SRX with approximately 22, 000 miles on the odometer, but only experienced the Headlight Defect in January 2021. This, Plaintiff says, is evidence that GM knew about the ramifications of the defect before it was revealed to the public.

GM should have issued a recall for the 2016 Cadillac SRX headlights

The headlight problem in the Cadillac SRX has been a persistent issue. While owners are receiving reimbursement for the cost of headlight repair, they have also reported problems with leaky sunroofs and rough idling. A faulty steering wheel sensor has also led to a recall of the SRX. In addition to the headlight problems, the SRX has also suffered from faulty coolant system seals and loose toe links. Cadillac had been avoiding this issue for years, but in a class-action lawsuit, they were forced to issue a recall and reimburse owners up to $1,600.

The low beam headlights of the Cadillac SRX suffer from the same defect as the SRX. The headlights in the SRX were recalled in May 2016 but GM allegedly knew about the defect since May 2010. Even though technical service bulletins have not solved the dimming issue, the lawsuit alleges that faulty headlight seals can lead to shorts and headlight failure. In some cases, drivers are forced to drive with high beams at all times.

GM failed to do so

The plaintiff claims that GM has knowingly sold a vehicle with defective headlights. The plaintiff alleges that the company knew about the defect before the plaintiff purchased her car. She claims GM failed to provide adequate repair or replacement parts for the defective headlights. Plaintiffs allege that GM failed to notify owners of the defect before the vehicles were sold, even though GM has admitted to knowing of the problem since the model year of 2016.

A recent lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court alleges that General Motors did not adequately warn Cadillac SRX owners of the problem. The defect affects the headlights’ exterior seals, allowing moisture and heat to enter the housing unit. This moisture can cause the headlights to dim and fail. The lawsuit argues that GM failed to provide adequate warnings to drivers and repair centers about the defect.

GM’s failure to do so resulted in dimmed headlights

Plaintiff Robert Elliott purchased a used Cadillac SRX in July 2016. About two years later, the high beams of his vehicle began to dim and he could no longer drive without them. It’s not clear what caused the problem, but Plaintiff claims that the defective headlight seals allowed moisture to accumulate in the headlamp assembly and damaged the reflectors. He had the $1,600 headlights replaced, but the problem continued to get worse.

While GM has issued a series of technical service bulletins to warn dealers about the problem, the manufacturer failed to notify owners or change its advertising to warn consumers. The faulty headlights continue to lead to safety concerns and some owners are afraid to drive at night. If you own an SRX, you may be able to file a class action lawsuit against GM for the condition.

GM’s failure to issue a recall resulted in low visibility

The NHTSA was restructured in 2016 and staff was added to reflect modern car technology. The agency is now more proactive and has hired a corporate-payouts attorney, Kenneth Feinberg. However, the carmaker’s leadership still disagrees with the agency’s recommendations. Despite the new structure, the NHTSA still oversaw more than nine hundred vehicle recalls last year, including a record-breaking four million vehicles. The NHTSA cited the lowered number of investigations, which is a sign that defects are being identified sooner. In the meantime, attorneys are a safety layer that can help companies comply with the law.

While the company was aware of the problems in ignition switches, it failed to issue a recall in time to stop people from dying. Instead, the company hid the defect for years, and the issue was so widespread that people weren’t aware of it. GM acknowledged that it had been aware of the problem since 2001, but failed to issue a recall until 2014. The automaker now faces federal and state investigations, as well as a slew of lawsuits and injury claims.

GM’s failure to issue a recall resulted in a class action lawsuit

GM sat on a potentially dangerous defect for years, but still failed to issue a recall and prevent owners from driving recalled cars. As a result, the automaker has been the subject of numerous lawsuits and investigations, and it has been accused of putting profit before the safety of its customers. Despite these findings, GM continues to face scrutiny from regulators and consumers alike.

The U.S. attorney’s office has launched a criminal investigation into GM’s handling of this recall. If you or a loved one have been harmed or suffered a loss due to a defective car, you may be eligible for compensation. If you bought or leased a GM vehicle with a faulty ignition switch, you may be eligible to receive compensation.

GM’s failure to issue a class action lawsuit led to a class action lawsuit

According to court documents, a GM SRX headlight defect has been known to GM since 2010, when the first SRX models hit the market. GM has issued Technical Service Bulletins (TSBs) informing dealers of the issue. Plaintiffs contend that these TSBs do not adequately resolve the problem, and instead simply replace the failed components with faulty ones.

The failure to issue an SRX class action lawsuit has led to the filing of an SRX headlight defect class action lawsuit in California and Florida. The lawsuit alleges that GM knew about the defect for years, but failed to issue a recall or issue a class action lawsuit to remedy the problem. Nevertheless, the automaker failed to issue a class action lawsuit, and it is now facing a lawsuit from drivers who purchased their vehicles before the GM recall.

Laws